Posts tagged "matt accarino"

BakedRicotta

Recipe: Baked Ricotta with Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes

July 15th, 2016 Posted by Chef fest 2016 0 thoughts on “Recipe: Baked Ricotta with Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes”

Recipe: Baked Ricotta with Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes, Saba, and Pignoli Granola

Chef: Matt Accarino

Restaurant: SPQR, San francisco

Serves 6

Ricotta and tomatoes together offers simple, satisfying summertime eating. In Tuscany and other parts of central Italy, it’s common to bake ricotta in a casserole and serve it at the table family-style. Essentially, this is a more stylized take on tradition, in which I portion the baked ricotta into rectangles and serve it with cherry tomatoes and a crunchy pine nut granola. Saba, a dark syrup made by cooking down must (the extracted juice from wine grapes), offers a sweet complement to the tomatoes.

To remove the skins, I blanch the cherry tomatoes in oil instead of water. Instead of adding water to the tomatoes, thus diluting their juices, I am concentrating their flavors.. As the tomatoes fry, the peels become loose. For presentation, we might peel some of the skins upwards so the tomatoes resemble ground cherries with papery skins pulled up to expose the fruit. Or we peel the skins and remove them completely.

Baked Ricotta

3 cups ricotta, drained
¼ cup pecorino, grated
2 each eggs, whisked
1/8 Cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2/3 teaspoon kosher salt
1 each nutmeg, grated to taste

Granola

2 tablespoons pine nuts
1 ½ tablespoons simple syrup
½ teaspoon honey
1 tablespoon oats
1 pinch kosher salt
½ teaspoon extra virgin olive oil

Tomatoes

1 cup cherry tomatoes
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 pinch coarse sea salt
5 – 10 each basil leaves, torn

Serving

½ cup purslane or sunflower shoots
Extra virgin olive oil
Saba, for finishing
Kosher salt

Baked Ricotta

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Coat a 9- by 13-inch baking dish with a light mist of non-stick spray. Cut a piece of parchment to fit the bottom of the rectangle and use it to line the bottom of the baking dish.

In a large bowl, whisk together the ricotta, pecorino, eggs, cream, olive oil, salt, and 10 rasps of nutmeg until smooth. Spoon the batter into the prepared baking dish, smoothing the surface with an offset spatula. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 45 minutes or until the ricotta has set firmly in the center. Uncover and cool to room temperature, about 1 hour. The top may poof in the center as it cooks, but it will fall back down as it cools.

With the tip of an offset spatula, loosen the edges of the ricotta. Turn a baking tray or platter upside down and press on top of the baked ricotta dish. In one smooth motion, pick up the dish and the tray, flip over, and place, tray-side down, on the counter. Remove the baking dish to unmold the ricotta. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until completely firm and cold, about 6 hours or overnight.

Before serving, line a baking sheet with foil and coat in a light mist of nonstick cooking spray. Cut the ricotta into 1 1/2 inch-wide strips. Cut the strips into 5- to 6-inch rectangles. Using a spatula, transfer the rectangles to the foil-lined baking sheet. You will have 8-10 rectangles.

Granola

Preheat the oven to 325ºF. In a small sauté pan over medium heat, toast the pine nuts until fragrant. Pour the pine nuts on a cutting board. Using the tip of a paring knife, cut the pine nuts in half. In a small bowl, mix together the simple syrup and honey. Add the pine nuts and oats and season with a pinch of salt.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a non-stick silicon sheet. Scatter the granola onto the sheet and bake until golden and dry, about 15 minutes. Cool completely.

Tomatoes

Score the bottom of each cherry tomato gently (just through the skin) with an X, taking the cuts up more than halfway up the side of each tomato.

Heat about 1 inch of olive oil in a straight-sided sauté pan over medium-high heat. Line a platter with paper towels. When the oil reaches between 365-375ºF, gently drop a few cherry tomatoes at a time and fry until the skins loosen, 10-15 seconds. Using a slotted spoon, lift the tomatoes out of the oil and drain on the paper towels. Season with coarse sea salt. Repeat until all the tomatoes have been fried. Scatter the basil leaves over the tomatoes and drizzle fresh olive oil lightly on top.

Serving

Preheat the oven to broil. Put the foil-lined baking sheet with the ricotta in the oven and broil until the tops begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove and cool slightly.

In a small bowl, season the purslane or sunflower shoots with a few drops of olive oil and saba. Season with a pinch of salt and toss.

To plate, using a spatula put a rectangle of ricotta onto 6 plates. Spoon the cherry tomatoes on the top and on the sides and scatter the greens over the top. Crumble the granola across each plate and finish with a drizzle of saba.

Farinata

Recipe: Farinata with Tomato-Braised Abalone

July 14th, 2016 Posted by Chef fest 2016 0 thoughts on “Recipe: Farinata with Tomato-Braised Abalone”

Recipe: Farinata with Tomato-Braised Abalone

Chef: Matt Accarino

Restaurant: SPQR, San francisco

Serves 4-6

Cooking local abalone is definitely one of my favorite perks of living on the West Coast. While the mollusk was overfished years ago, entrepreneurs have managed to farm red abalone successfully, opening up opportunities for chefs like me who are always looking for another ingredient to champion. With abalone, it’s easy to get excited. Not only are they visually captivating, arriving at the restaurant in their large, decorative shells, but they also taste deliciously briny. Abalone are not hard to prepare. Like octopus or squid, you either cook it briefly or for a long time—anything in between will be tough and chewy. In this preparation, I choose the latter, braising it with tomatoes, capers, and garlic so it soaks up the flavors of the Italian coast. Alone or with pasta, braised abalone is more than satisfying, but I’m partial to serving it with farinata. Sold in Ligurian bakeshops, these thin, chickpea cakes are cooked slowly in wide cast-iron pans inside wood-burning ovens. Since I don’t have quite the same set-up in my kitchen, I’ve adapted the process for our kitchen, preparing and baked the farinata in a conventional oven instead.

Instead of abalone, you can use squid or octopus in this recipe. Because the weight provided for the abalone in this recipe includes the shell, use half the weight for squid or octopus. To finish the dish, I like to add small bits of dehydrated olives for an intense bite of salty flavor. I use Taggiasca olives, which are similar, though milder and rounder, than nicoise. If unavailable, nicoise or gaeta are fine.

Ingredients

2 cups chickpea flour

4 1/3 cups water

1 ea garlic clove, minced

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

2 teaspoons kosher salt

5 turns black pepper from a peppermill

½ teaspoon chopped rosemary

Dehydrated Olives

20 each black olives, such as Taggiasca

Abalone

10 pieces red abalone
1 tablespoon Wondra flour for dusting
1 each yellow onion, thinly sliced
To taste kosher salt
3 each garlic cloves
1 pinch dried chili flakes
1 cup white wine
2 cups chicken stock
1 can cherry tomatoes
3 tablespoons capers, rinsed well
1 each white anchovy, minced

Serving

To taste extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon Wondra flour for dusting
5 each basil leaves, thinly sliced
1 each lemon

Farinata

Lightly coat 1 (9- by 13-inch) baking pan or one large rimmed baking sheet with non-stick spray. In a blender, purée the chickpea flour and water. Pour the batter into a large, heavy-bottomed pot and place over medium heat. Whisk in the garlic, olive oil, salt, and pepper and continue to cook, whisking constantly, until thickened to a paste, about 15 minutes. Stir in the rosemary, then pour the batter into the prepared baking pan. Level the pan by tapping it lightly against the counter. Refrigerate the farinata, uncovered, until set, at least 2 hours or overnight.

With a 3-inch cutter, punch the chilled farinata into rounds, cutting as close as possible to limit the amount of trimmings remaining. You should have 6 rounds Blot the rounds dry between paper towels and refrigerate until needed.

Dehydrated Olives

In three lengthwise slices, cut the olive meat off the olives (see page 000). Save the olive meat for another use. To make the dehydrated olives, place the pits (they should still have some olive meat attached to them on the ends) in a dehydrator and dehydrate between 125-150˚F overnight. Alternatively, preheat the oven to 200˚F. Scatter the pits on a baking sheet and allow them to dry out in the oven for 2-3 hours. Once dried, remove the dried olive meat from the pits and chop, discarding the pits. Reserve the dehydrated olives for garnish.

Abalone

Preheat the oven to 325˚F. Using a large pallet knife or kitchen spoon, pry underneath the foot of the abalone muscle to dislodge it from the shell. Spread the abalone onto a cutting board and score the muscle on one side with a ¼-inch deep crosshatch pattern. Cover the board with a large piece of plastic wrap and pound the abalone lightly with a mallet to tenderize the muscle.

Heat a thin film of olive oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Season the abalone with salt and dust with Wondra flour, shaking off any excess. Sear until lightly browned on both sides, then transfer to a plate.

Wipe the pot clean with a paper towel and heat a thin film of olive oil over medium-low heat. Stir in the onions and a pinch of salt and sweat for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and sweat for 1 minute, or until both the onion and garlic have softened. Sprinkle the chile flakes into the pot and sweat for a few seconds more to release the chile flavor Pour in the white wine and bring the pot to a simmer. Pour the chicken stock and tomatoes into the pot, return to a simmer, and stir in the abalone. Cover the pot and transfer to the oven.

Braise for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until the abalone slide off a skewer when pierced. Uncover the pot and cool for 20 minutes. Fish out the abalone pieces and slice crosswise into thin strips. Return the slices to the braise, then bring the pot to a low simmer and stir in the capers, anchovies, and sliced olives. Turn off the heat and keep warm.

Serving

In a large sauté pan with straight sides or a cast-iron skillet, heat 1/2 inch of olive oil over medium-high heat. Once a few flecks of flour sizzle in the oil, dust the farinata rounds in Wondra flour, shaking off any excess. In batches to avoid crowding the pan, sear the rounds until golden brown on one side. Using a spatula or fork, flip over the rounds away from you to avoid splattering oil onto your body. Brown the other side, then drain the farinata on paper towels and keep warm. Add more olive oil in between batches if necessary.

Return the braise to a simmer. Coarsely chop half of the chervil and stir it into the braise with the basil.

To serve, place 1 farinata disk at the base of 6 soup bowls. Divide the abalone pieces evenly among the bowls and spoon some braising liquid over the top. Grate lemon zest over each bowl. Slice the lemon in half, then squeeze a few drops of lemon juice into each bowl. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil, a few sprigs of chervil, and a sprinkling of dehydrated olives.

featured_MattAccarrino

A Minute with the Chef: Matt Accarrino

July 14th, 2016 Posted by Chef fest 2016 0 thoughts on “A Minute with the Chef: Matt Accarrino”

Quote RE: Participating in Chef Fest –

“I love to travel and cook with local products in the place they are from. I’m looking forward to that experience in this unique Hawaiian paradise alongside fellow chefs and guests.”

Q&A

1) First Dish I remember cooking:

Pizza with my grandmother.

2) What prep to you hate to do? Love to do?

Scaling fish, so messy no matter what. Hand-making pasta.

3) What food is your guilty pleasure?

Coffee.  I drink too much of it!

4) If you weren’t a chef what occupation would you like to try and why?

Pro cyclist.  I love to suffer!

5) What or who inspires your culinary creativity and why?

My Environment, experience, seasonality, where I am and where I’ve been. I’ve learned to follow my intuition.

Reserve. Today
Elegant beachside spot at the Four Seasons Resort features modern Italian fare & island cocktails.
OPEN TABLE RESERVATION
[open-table-widget display_option="0" time_start="7:00am" time_end="7:00pm" time_increment="15" restaurant_id="72247" title="Beach Tree"]
Reserve. Today
Open-air chophouse in the Four Seasons offering dishes with local twists & views of the golf course.
OPEN TABLE RESERVATION
[open-table-widget display_option="0" time_start="7:00am" time_end="7:00pm" time_increment="15" restaurant_id="152518" title="Hualalai Grille"]
Reserve. Today
An inventive Hawaiian menu is showcased at this oceanfront restaurant in the Four Seasons Resort.
OPEN TABLE RESERVATION
[open-table-widget display_option="0" time_start="7:00am" time_end="7:00pm" time_increment="15" restaurant_id="72253" title="ULU Ocean Grill + Sushi Lounge"]
Reserve. Today
Elegant beachside spot at the Four Seasons Resort features modern Italian fare & island cocktails.
OPEN TABLE RESERVATION
[open-table-widget display_option="0" time_start="7:00am" time_end="7:00pm" time_increment="15" restaurant_id="72247" title="Beach Tree"]
Reserve. Today
Open-air chophouse in the Four Seasons offering dishes with local twists & views of the golf course.
OPEN TABLE RESERVATION
[open-table-widget display_option="0" time_start="7:00am" time_end="7:00pm" time_increment="15" restaurant_id="152518" title="Hualalai Grille"]
Reserve. Today
An inventive Hawaiian menu is showcased at this oceanfront restaurant in the Four Seasons Resort.
OPEN TABLE RESERVATION
[open-table-widget display_option="0" time_start="7:00am" time_end="7:00pm" time_increment="15" restaurant_id="72253" title="ULU Ocean Grill + Sushi Lounge"]
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